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Microsoft fumbles supply chain and acknowledges signing rootkit malware.

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Microsoft fumbles supply chain

As of right now, Microsoft has admitted to signing a malicious driver that is disseminated in gaming contexts.

This “Netfilter”-named driver is really a rootkit that has been seen interacting with Chinese C2 IP addresses.

Last week, the whole infosec. community joined G Data malware specialist Karsten Hahn in tracking down and analysing the malicious drivers that bore the Microsoft logo.

This event highlighted vulnerabilities to software supply-chain security once more, but this time it was caused by a flaw in the code-signing procedure used by Microsoft.

Rootkit “Netfilter” driver is Microsoft-signed.

A Microsoft signed driver dubbed “Netfilter” was detected last week by G Data’s cybersecurity alert systems as what at first glance seemed to be a false positive, but wasn’t.

The driver in question was observed interacting with C&C IPs situated in China, which had no valid functionality and triggered red flags.

This is when Karsten Hahn, a malware analyst at G Data, disclosed this publicly and contacted Microsoft at the same time:

Since Windows Vista, all code that operates in kernel mode must be verified and certified before being made available to the public in order to maintain the stability of the operating system.

According to Hahn, “Drivers without a Microsoft certificate cannot be deployed by default.”

At that time, BleepingComputer started tracking C2 URL activity and approached Microsoft for a comment.

A list of further routes (URLs), denoted by the pipe (“|”) symbol, are returned by the initial C2 URL:

Each of them, in Hahn’s opinion, has a function:

The URL that ends in “/p” refers to proxy settings, “/s” offers encoded redirection IPs, “/h?” is for getting CPU-ID, “/c” offered a root certificate, and “/v?” refers to the malware’s self-updating capabilities.
For instance, as observed by BleepingComputer, the malicious Netfilter driver in question (residing at “/d3”) was accessible via the “/v?” path at the following URL:

After thoroughly examining the driver, the G Data researcher came to the conclusion that it was malware.

In a thorough blog post, the researcher examined the driver, its ability to self-update, and Indicators of Compromise (IOCs).

According to Hahn, the sample features a self-update routine that transmits its own MD5 hash to the server via the URL hxxp:/110.42.4.180:2081/v?v=6&m=.

Other malware specialists including Johann Aydinbas, Takahiro Haruyama, and Florian Roth worked with Hahn throughout his investigation.

Roth has offered YARA rules for recognising them in your network settings after being able to compile the list of samples in a spreadsheet.

Notably, the malicious Netfilter driver connects to the C2 IP 110.42.4.180 that, according to WHOIS data, belonged to Ningbo Zhuo Zhi Innovation Network Technology Co., Ltd:

Microsoft acknowledges signing the harmful driver.

Microsoft is currently looking into this situation, even though there isn’t any proof that any stolen code-signing certificates were ever utilised.

The error appears to have been caused by the threat actor using Microsoft’s submission mechanism to submit the malicious Netfilter drivers and successfully obtaining the Microsoft-signed binaries through legal channels:

Microsoft is looking at a bad actor who spreads harmful drivers inside of gaming environments.

“In order to be certified by the Windows Hardware Compatibility Program, the actor supplied drivers. A third party created the drivers.”

Microsoft stated yesterday, “We have stopped the account and checked their uploads for additional indicators of malware.”

Microsoft claims that the threat actor primarily targeted the gaming industry in China with these malicious drivers and that there is currently no evidence that business environments have been impacted.

Microsoft is waiting before blaming nation-state actors for this event.

Sophisticated threat actors may take use of falsely signed binaries to help launch extensive software supply-chain assaults.

A well-known event in which code-signing certificates were taken from Realtek and JMicron to assist the comprehensive Stuxnet attack on Iran’s nuclear programme.

However, this specific instance has shown flaws in a reliable code-signing procedure, which threat actors have exploited to get Microsoft-signed code without jeopardising any certifications.

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What is faze save kidshaywarddecrypt?

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faze save kidshaywarddecrypt

“Faze Save Kidshaywarddecrypt” likely refers to a meme or joke within the gaming community.

Esports faze save

“Faze Clan” is a professional esports and entertainment organization, primarily known for their presence in the Call of Duty and Counter-Strike: Global Offensive scenes. “Faze Save” could refer to a clutch play or a significant moment in a match where a player from the Faze Clan saved the round for their team. However, without more context, it’s difficult to determine the specific meaning of “Faze Save.”

Several players of the popular esports FaZe clan were suspended recently for promoting a controversial cryptocurrency called Save The Kids. Save The Kids was advertised as an alternative to Dogecoin and Etherium, and it promised to donate a portion of the proceeds to a charity. The controversy caused a huge backlash from fans, who slammed the clan for its shady business practices.

The members of FaZe Clan have denied being involved with the scheme, but anyone found to be involved in the scheme could face serious consequences. FaZe Clan’s reputation could be ruined, and potential sponsors could be discouraged from working with the group.

Faze clan save

“Faze Clan Save” could refer to a clutch play or a significant moment in a match where a player from the Faze Clan saved the round for their team. It might be used to describe a play that was critical to the outcome of a match and helped secure a win for Faze Clan.

faze save the kids

“Save the Kids” is a phrase that has become popular in internet culture and is often used as a hashtag or meme. The exact meaning of “Save the Kids” varies depending on the context, but it generally refers to a call to action or a show of support for a cause, often related to children’s rights, safety, or well-being.

In the context of “Faze Save the Kids”, it’s possible that it is a reference to the Faze Clan supporting the “Save the Kids” cause or using the phrase as a rallying cry within the gaming community. However, without more context, it is difficult to determine the exact meaning.

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Sources:On Monday, Facebook will reveal a range of music products, such as a Clubhouse-like app, a podcast discovery service integrated with Spotify, and more. (Vox, Peter Kafka)

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Sources:On Monday, Facebook will reveal a range of music products, such as a Clubhouse-like app, a podcast discovery service integrated with Spotify, and more. (Vox, Peter Kafka)

Peter Kafka / Vox:

Several audio products, including a Clubhouse-like app, a podcast finding service integrated with Spotify, and more, will be unveiled by Facebook on Monday, according to sources. On Monday, there will be announcements, although some things won’t be available for some time. — Facebook wants you to start communicating with others on the site.

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ByteDance’s founder Zhang Yiming steps down as Executive Chairman

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Zhang Yiming
The founder of TikTok’s parent company ByteDance founder Zhang Yiming has stepped down as chairman after announcing last May he was resigning as CEO and moving into a strategy role. New CEO Liang Rubo has taken over as chairman of the company’s board. The news comes shortly after the company announced a major organisational reshuffle at ByteDance to create six separate business units.
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